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Foot Injuries, Breaks, and Sprains

A foot or ankle sprain is a soft tissue injury. Most often, a sprain occurs when an injury pulls, stretches, or tears the ligaments that connect bone to bone. A fracture is actually a break in the bone. Many breaks and sprains occur during sports. Tripping or stumbling on uneven ground is another common cause of foot and ankle sprains and fractures. Symptoms of a sprained or broken foot or ankle include pain, swelling, bruising, and difficulty walking on the affected foot or ankle.

Diagnosis

A podiatrist will carefully examine your feet and ankles and take a complete medical history. He or she will also order tests, including an X-ray, ultrasound, or MRI, to determine the extent of your injury. If you have a fracture that's clearly visible on X-ray, you may not need additional testing.

Foot or Ankle Sprain Treatment Approach

Treatment will depend on your injury. If you have a broken bone, your podiatrist may attempt to “reduce” the fracture, which means lining up the ends of the bones so they can heal properly. (You'll be given a local anesthetic to numb the area first.) If the fracture is “unstable,” meaning that the ends of the bone do not stay in place after a reduction, surgery may be needed. Podiatrists can use metal plates and screws to fix broken bones.

Stress fractures are treated with rest and immobilization. You will be instructed to stay off the affected area until healing is complete. Crutches and/or a special “boot” or cast may be used to immobilize the area.

Sprains are also treated with a period of immobilization. Depending on the extent of your sprain, you may be able to resume activity fairly quickly, or you may need to wear a soft cast or special “boot” and use crutches for a period of weeks.

Professional athletes may undergo surgery to repair torn ligaments.

Oral anti-inflammatory medication, such as ibuprofen, can be used to decrease pain, swelling, and inflammation.