Mother-to-child HIV transmission lower in infants with high antibody function levels

The antibody function known as antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is associated with protection against HIV in infants, according to new research from Boston Medical Center. Data from the study show that infants with high levels of ADCC against their mother’s strain of HIV are less likely to get HIV through breast milk and have lower rates of morbidity and death even without antiretroviral therapy.

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Mother-to-child HIV transmission lower in infants with high antibody function levels

The antibody function known as antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is associated with protection against HIV in infants, according to new research from Boston Medical Center. Data from the study show that infants with high levels of ADCC against their mother’s strain of HIV are less likely to get HIV through breast milk and have lower rates of morbidity and death even without antiretroviral therapy.

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