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Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Diagnosis

Orthopedic Surgery

How is Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy diagnosed?

After discussing your medical history and general health, your doctor will ask you about your symptoms. He or she will conduct a thorough examination of your neck, shoulders, arms, hands, and legs, looking for:

  • Changes in reflexes—including the presence of hyper-reflexia, a condition in which reflexes are exaggerated or overactive
  • Numbness and weakness in the arms, hands, and fingers
  • Trouble walking, loss of balance, or weakness in the legs
  • Atrophy—a condition in which muscles deteriorate and shrink in size

CSM Tests

X-rays. These provide images of dense structures, such as bone. An x-ray will show the alignment of the vertebrae in your neck.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. These studies create better images of the body's soft tissues. An MRI can show spinal cord compression and help determine whether your symptoms are caused by damage to soft tissues—such as a bulging or herniated disc.

Computed tomography (CT) scans. More detailed that a plain x-ray, a CT scan can show narrowing of the spinal canal and can help your doctor determine whether you have developed bone spurs in your cervical spine.

Myelogram. This is a special type of CT scan. In this procedure, a contrast dye is injected into the spinal column to make the spinal cord and nerve roots show up more clearly.