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Deviated Septum

A deviated septum occurs when the septum is severely shifted away from the midline. The most common symptom from a badly deviated or crooked septum is difficulty breathing through the nose. The symptoms are usually worse on one side, and sometimes actually occur on the side opposite the bend. In some cases, the crooked septum can interfere with the drainage of the sinuses, resulting in repeated sinus infections.
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Tinnitus

Tinnitus or head noises is the perception of sound without an external source being present. Tinnitus may be an intermittent or continuous sound in one or both ears. Its pitch can go from a low roar to a high squeal or whine or it can have many sounds.
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Otosclerosis

Otosclerosis is a condition of abnormal bone growth around the stapes bone, one of the tiny bones of the middle ear. This leads to a fixation of the stapes bone. The stapes bone must move freely for the ear to work properly and hear well.
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Noise Induced Hearing Loss

When we are exposed to harmful noises, sounds that are too loud, or loud sounds that last a long time sensitive structures in the inner ear can be damaged, causing noise-induced hearing loss. Hair cells are small sensory cells that convert sound energy into electrical signals that travel to the brain, where the brain converts them into meaningful sounds. Once damaged, hair cells cannot grow back and lose the ability to conduct sound.

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Hyperacusis (Increased Sensitivity to Everyday Sounds)

Hyperacusis is a condition that arises from a problem in the way the brain’s central auditory processing center perceives noise. It can often lead to pain and discomfort.

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Genes and Hearing Loss

One of the most common birth defects is hearing loss or deafness (congenital), which can affect as many as three of every 1,000 babies born. Inherited genetic defects play an important role in congenital hearing loss, contributing to about 60% of deafness occurring in infants. Although exact data is not available, it is likely that genetics plays an important role in hearing loss in the elderly.

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Ear Infection and Vaccines (Middle Ear Infection or Otitis Media)

Researchers continue to look for help for children and parents of children who suffer from the most common type of ear infection, called middle ear infection or otitis media (OM). About 62 percent of children in developed countries will have their first episode of OM by the age of one, more than 80 percent by their third birthday, and nearly 100 percent will have at least one episode by age five.

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Oral Appliances

What is an Oral Appliance?

Oral appliances are one of the treatment options for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). These devices are similar to mouth guards or orthodontic retainers that are worn in the mouth during sleep. They are designed to prevent soft tissue in the airway from collapsing and causing obstruction. These appliances can be used alone or in combination with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) or surgery.

Tonsillectomy and Adenoids Post-Op

The tonsils are two clusters of tissue located on both sides of the back of the throat. Adenoids sit high in the throat behind the nose and the roof of the mouth. Tonsils and adenoids are often removed when they become enlarged and block the upper airway, leading to breathing difficulty. They are also removed when recurrence of tonsil infections or strep throat cannot be successfully treated by antibiotics. The surgery is most often performed on children.

Ear Infection and Hearing Loss

Otitis media refers to inflammation of the middle ear. When an abrupt infection occurs, the condition is called "acute otitis media." Acute otitis media occurs when a cold, allergy, and the presence of bacteria or viruses lead to the accumulation of pus and mucus behind the eardrum, blocking the Eustachian tube. This can cause earache and fever.

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