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Oral Tumors

Growths can start in any area of the mouth, including bones, muscles, nerves and connective tissues, but they usually form on the lips, sides of the tongue, the soft palate and the floor of the mouth. Most oral growths like warts and oral candidiasis (thrush) are benign (not cancerous). Some types of oral tumors can become more serious. Most salivary gland tumors are slow-growing, benign and painless, although some can become cancerous.

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Oral Cysts

An oral cyst is an unexpected fluid-filled sac in or around the mouth that can be caused or aggravated by an infection in the pulp area of the tooth, overly irritated or injured tissue in the mouth or an impacted wisdom tooth. Symptoms include a lump inside of the mouth or along the jawbone or pain near the teeth. Some cysts are painless, while others that become infected or abscessed can become red, swollen and very painful. While oral cysts are not cancerous, it’s important to have a dentist examine any cyst that forms, especially if it does not go away.

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Oral Cancer

A type of cancer in the category of head and neck cancer, oral cancer can occur on any part of the mouth including the lips, gums, tongue, inside cheek lining, or the roof or floor of the mouth. There are several types of oral cancers, but most are squamous cell carcinomas. Often, oral cancer is discovered only after it has metastasized (spread to another location), typically the lymph nodes of the neck.

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Dental Implants

When an individual has lost an adult tooth, a dental implant can offer a replacement solution that’s less disruptive to surrounding teeth than a dental bridge and more permanent than a denture. Dental implant surgery replaces tooth roots with metal posts that are covered with artificial teeth. The procedure is typically done in multiple stages to allow the jawbone time to heal around the implant and achieve the best results.

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Cleft Lip And Palate

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Strabismus

Strabismus (or amblyopia) is a condition caused by a malfunction of the muscles that control eye movement, preventing both eyes from aligning and focusing on one object together. With strabismus, the eyes can turn in (cross eyed), or turn up, out or down, causing symptoms like blurry vision, lazy eye (amblyopia), double vision, headache and more. The condition can be present at birth (congenital) or develop later, signaling the possibility of a serious neurological problem. There are many known causes, including Downs syndrome, cerebral palsy and stroke.

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Ptosis

Ptosis (or lazy eye) is a drooping of the upper or lower eyelid, which happens when the muscles of the eyelid are not strong enough to work the eyelid properly. Aging can cause these muscles to deteriorate, but some people are born with the condition. Other factors like trauma and inflammation can cause ptosis as can a condition like Horner syndrome, an interruption of the facial nerve that leads to the brain.

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Optic Nerve Problems

The optic nerve is a bundle of nerve fibers that runs between the eye and the brain so that visual information can travel between them. It is considered part of the central nervous system. Damage, injury, infection, and disease regarding the optic nerve can cause loss of vision.

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Open Angle Glaucoma

Open-angle glaucoma is the most common type of glaucoma, an eye condition caused by fluid buildup that causes increased eye pressure, affecting the optic nerve. Open-angle glaucoma has no noticeable symptoms other than a gradual loss in vision.

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Narrow (Closed) Angle Glaucoma

Narrow angle glaucoma is an eye condition that occurs when the iris bulges forward, interrupting the flow of eye fluid and causing a fast increase in eye pressure. Symptoms include sudden, severe eye pain accompanied by nausea and vomiting, halo or blurred vision, and red eyes.

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