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Cogeneration Power Plant

Boston Medical Center Installs $15 Million Cogeneration Plant to Increase Energy Efficiency and Resiliency

2018 Grayken Center for Addiction Young Adult Summit

2018 Grayken Center for Addiction Young Adult Summit

Agenda

7:30 am – 8:00 am: Breakfast and Registration

7:50 am – 8:00 am: Welcome

Michael Botticelli, MEd, The Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center

8:00 am – 8:10 am: Introduction

Sarah Bagley, MD, MSc, The Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center
Scott Hadland, MD, MPH, MS, The Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center

8:10 am – 8:30 am: Personal Narrative from a Young Adult in Recovery

8:30 am – 9:15 am: Keynote Panel - Developing Principles of Care for Young Adults with SUDs
Moderator:

Michael Botticelli, Med, The Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center
Panelists:
Zev Schuman Olivier, MD, Cambridge Health Alliance
John Zibbell, PhD, RTI International
Sharon Levy, MD, MPH, Boston Children’s Hospital
Carolyn Castro-Donlan, PhD, Castro-Donlan Consulting LLC

9:15 am – 9:30 am: Break (Refreshments Provided)

9:30 am – 11:00 am: Break Out Session 1

Group A: Intersection of Emerging Adults and the Criminal Justice System
Selen Perker, Esq., LLM, The Justice Lab at Columbia University
Lael Chester, The Justice Lab at Columbia University
Group B: Treatment with Medications
Scott Hadland, MD, MPH, MS, The Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center
Brandon Marshall, PhD, Brown University
Group C: Dealing with Concurrent Mental Health Issues and Trauma
Lisa Fortuna, MD, MPH, MDiv, The Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center
Sarah Valentine, PhD, The Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center

11:30 am – 12:00 pm: Defining Success for Young Adults with SUDs

Kathleen Meyers, PhD, JBS International

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm: Lunch and Lightning Sessions (Lunch Provided)

12:00 pm – 12:15 pm Lightning Session – Involuntary Treatment

Leo Beletsky, JD, MPH, Northeastern School of Law

12:15 pm – 12:30 pm Lightning Session – Trafficked Populations

Audrey Morrissey, My Life My Choice

1:00 pm – 2:30 pm: Break Out Session 2

Group A: Engaging Families in Intervention and Treatment
Sarah Bagley, MD, MSc, The Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center
Fred Muench, PhD, Partnership for Drug Free Kids
Group B: Harm and Risk Reduction
Daniel Raymond, The Harm Reduction Coalition
Jessica Gaeta, MD, Boston Health Care for the Homeless
Group C: Role of Young Adult Support Services
Justin Luke Riley, Young People In Recovery
Scott Strode, The Phoenix

2:30 pm – 3:00 pm Break (Refreshments Provided)

3:00 pm – 4:30 pm: Synthesizing Insights from the Breakout Sessions

Facilitator: Joshua Sharfstein, MD, Johns Hopkins University

4:30 pm – 5:00 pm: Concluding Remarks

Michael Botticelli, MEd The Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center

Breakout Session Leaders

Michael Botticelli, Executive Director, Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center

Michael Botticelli, MEd

Executive Director, Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center

Michael Botticelli is one of the nation's leading addiction experts, and served as the Director of National Drug Control Policy at the White House under President Obama. He was the first person to hold the position who was also in long-term recovery from a substance use disorder and who came from a public health background.

This marks a return to Boston for him, where he previously served as Director of the Bureau of Substance Abuse Services at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, working closely with many BMC experts and others to extend successful models of care developed at BMC across the state and the nation. He has served in a variety of leadership roles for the National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors. He was a member of the Advisory Committee for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's Center for Substance Abuse Prevention and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. He has also co-authored many peer-reviewed articles that have significantly contributed to the field. Born in Upstate New York, Mr. Botticelli holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Siena College and a Master of Education degree from St. Lawrence University.

Contact: [email protected]


Sarah Bagley, MD, MSc

Sarah Bagley, MD, MSc

Assistant Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine, Medical Director for the CATALYST Clinic;
The Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center

Sarah Bagley is the founder and director of the BMC program for adolescents and young adults with substance use disorders called CATALYST (Center for Addiction Treatment for AdoLescent/Young adults who use SubsTances). She also serves as an attending physician on the Inpatient Addiction Medicine Consult Service team at BMC and is an assistant professor of medicine and pediatrics at BUSM. Prior to her appointment at BMC, Bagley trained in a combined internal medicine-pediatrics program at Brown University. Her research focuses on the engagement of adolescent and young adults in substance use disorder treatment and involving family in addiction treatment.

Contact: [email protected]


Scott Hadland, MD, MPH, MS

Scott Hadland, MD, MPH, MS

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine,
Director of the Urban Health and Advocacy Track for Boston Children's Hospital and Boston Medical Center Combined Residency Program in Pediatrics at Boston Medical Center;
The Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center

Scott Hadland is pediatrician and addiction specialist at Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine. Dr. Hadland's clinical and research interests focus on youth substance use and improving care for young people who use heroin and prescription opioids. His work has been published in leading journals, including The Lancet, JAMA Pediatrics, JAMA Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and Addiction. Dr. Hadland was the 2016 recipient of the New Investigator Award from the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine and has received funding from the Thrasher Research Fund, Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine, Academic Pediatric Association, and National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Contact: [email protected]

Keynote Panel – Developing Principles of Care for Young Adults with SUDs

Zev Schuman Olivier, MD

Zev Schuman Olivier, MD

Executive Director and Research Director, Cambridge Health Alliance (CHA) Center for Mindfulness and Compassion, Cambridge Health Alliance
Instructor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School,
Faculty Member and Investigator at the Center for Technology and Behavioral Health at Dartmouth

Zev Schuman-Olivier, MD is the Executive Director and Research Director of the CHA Center for Mindfulness and Compassion, Medical Director for Addiction Services at CHA, Instructor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, Faculty Member and Investigator at the Center for Technology and Behavioral Health at Dartmouth, and an addictions psychiatrist at CHA. As a board-certified addiction psychiatrist, he has been involved with research and clinical care of patients with addiction and mental illness. Prior to his psychiatric residency, he helped coordinate and implement the first federally-funded, randomized controlled trial of a mindfulness-oriented intervention for addictive disorders. Dr. Schuman-Olivier has presented locally, regionally and nationally on mindfulness for addictions treatment, and has trained residents and peers on the topic. He is currently the principal investigator for the MINDFUL-PC project, which aims to integrate mindfulness into the patient-centered medical home.

Contact: [email protected]


John Zibbell, PhD

John Zibbell, PhD

Senior Public Health Scientist
Behavioral Health Program
RTI International

Jon E. Zibbell, PhD is a senior public health scientist in the Behavioral Health Program at the RTI International where he conducts community-based, epidemiological research on risk factors and health outcomes associated with the opioid epidemic and injection drug use. Jon is a medical anthropologist with two decades of field experience in the areas of injection drug use, opioid use disorder, drug overdose and injection-related infectious disease. Before coming to RTI, Dr. Zibbell worked as a CDC behavioral health scientist in the Divisions of Viral Hepatitis and Unintentional Injury Prevention conducting epidemiological and surveillance research on viral hepatitis and drug overdose while assisting States in responding to injuries and infections caused by illicit drug use. In 2015, he served on the White House Heroin Task Force and helped develop the Obama Administration's response to the illicit opioid epidemic. Beyond research, Dr. Zibbell has conducted rapid ethnographic assessments for community-based syringe service and overdose prevention programs and continues to assist states and community organizations to develop evidence-based approaches to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with the opioid epidemic. His work has appeared in both academic and professional, peer-reviewed journals and he holds a joint, adjunct appointment in the Center for the Study of Human Health and the Department of Anthropology at Emory University.

Contact: [email protected]


Sharon Levy, MD, MPH

Sharon Levy, MD, MPH

Director, Adolescent Substance Use and Addiction Program
Division of Developmental Medicine
Boston Children's Hospital

Sharon Levy, MD, MPH is a board certified Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrician and an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. She is the Director of the Adolescent Substance use and Addiction Program (ASAP) in the Division of Developmental Medicine at Boston Children's Hospital. She has evaluated and treated thousands of adolescents with substance use disorders, and has taught national curricula and published extensively on the outpatient management of substance use disorders in adolescents, including screening and brief advice in primary care, the use of drug testing and the outpatient management of opioid dependent adolescents. She is the a past chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Substance Use and Prevention, the President of the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA) and serves on the board of directors of the Addiction Medicine Fellowship Director's Association.

Contact: [email protected]


Carolyn Castro-Donlan, PhD

Carolyn Castro-Donlan, PhD

President and CEO of Castro-Donlan Consulting LLC

Carolyn Castro-Donlan PhD is currently President and CEO of Castro-Donlan Consulting, LLC in Ashburn, VA. She brings over 30 years of public and private experience in health and human services. This includes experience in strategic planning, program development and implementation, cross systems collaboration and strategic community mobilization. She has working knowledge of federal, state and local government processes as well as that of community based non-profit organizations. Dr. Castro-Donlan has extensive experience with strategic planning among diverse settings and disciplines including specific race/ethnic and tribal populations. Current consulting focus include development of federal and state proposal documents and related service planning specific to Medication Assisted Treatment Services (MAT) for Opioid Use Disorders and Adolescent and Young Adult State Infrastructure Initiatives. In addition to strategic planning with state and local government leadership; program and agency executive coaching with a focus on strategic decision making; implementation of process improvement strategies and the integration of behavioral health and primary care services at the community level.

Ms. Castro-Donlan established and served as the Director of the Office of Youth and Young Adult Services with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Bureau of Substance Abuse Services. In this role, she provided direction and oversight to the development of innovative youth centric substance use programs focused on improving outcomes among this population and their families. Prior to this position, Ms. Castro-Donlan served as the Deputy Director for the Massachusetts Bureau of Substance Abuse Services and has held other key leadership positions in the Massachusetts Department of Public Health.

As a service provider, she has been a Program Director for community based residential and outpatient substance abuse services and started her career out as a Licensed Practical Nurse.  She holds a Doctor of Philosophy degree for Social Policy and Management from Brandeis University and a master’s degree in psychology from Harvard University, a bachelor’s degree in Psychology and Addiction Studies from University of Florida. She also served on various boards including as President of the Board for the New England Institute of Addiction Studies.

Contact: [email protected]

Breakout Session 1

Group A: Intersection of Emerging Adults and the Criminal Justice System

Selen Perker, Esq., LLM

Selen Perker, Esq., LLM

Senior Research Associate
The Justice Lab at Columbia University

Selen Perker has over eight years of experience as a justice reform and governance professional supporting efforts of governments, NGOs, national and international development institutions, including the World Bank and the UNDP, to develop locally-designed indicators of justice that measure impact of existing practices and programs, and inform new administrative policies and strategies. Her passion is bridging academic research with policy and practice at all stages, from research design engaging practitioners to presenting and disseminating findings via innovative and accessible knowledge products.

As a Senior Research Associate with the Justice Lab at Columbia University, Perker currently conducts quantitative and qualitative research on justice practices affecting emerging adults, a distinct group transitioning from childhood to adulthood, from the age of 18 to 25. Until October 2017, Perker was a Research Fellow with the Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management (PCJ) at Harvard Kennedy School, where she led PCJ's field influence work stream in Ethiopia, and supported the work of an international team in Jamaica, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and Bangladesh within the framework of PCJ's multi-M$ project, Indicators for Development: Safety and Justice. Since 2010, she has been working closely with government officials to design and use performance measures across the justice sector, from police to courts and prisons, spanning a wide variety of themes, from pretrial detention to violence against women and girls.

Contact: [email protected]


Lael Chester

Lael Chester

Research Fellow
The Justice Lab at Columbia University

Group B: Treatment with Medications

Brandon Marshall, PhD

Brandon Marshall, PhD

Associate Professor
Department of Epidemiology
Brown University School of Public Health

Brandon Marshall is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology at the Brown University School of Public Health. He received a PhD in epidemiology from the School of Population and Public Health at the University of British Columbia. In 2011 he completed postdoctoral training at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.

His research interests focus on infectious disease epidemiology, substance use, and the social, environmental, and structural determinants of health of vulnerable populations. He has published more than 150 scientific publications, including articles in JAMA, BMJ, and The Lancet. He is the Principal Investigator of multiple NIH-funded studies investigating the determinants of HIV, hepatitis C, and overdose among people who use drugs. He works closely with the Rhode Island Department of Health on the state's overdose epidemic efforts and directs www.PreventOverdoseRI.org, a CDC-funded statewide online surveillance system. He also serves as an expert advisor to the Governor's Overdose Prevention and Intervention Task Force. He has received numerous accolades and awards for his research, including the Henry Merrit Wriston Fellowship from Brown University in 2015, and the 2016 Brian MacMahon Early Career Award from the Society for Epidemiologic Research.

Contact: [email protected]


Group C: Dealing with Concurrent Mental Health Issues and Trauma

Lisa Fortuna, MD, MPH, MDiv

Lisa Fortuna, MD, MPH, MDiv

Medical Director of Medicine and Adolescent Psychiatry
Boston University School of Medicine
The Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center

Lisa Fortuna is the medical director for child and adolescent psychiatry services for the Boston Medical Center, and co-director of the Transforming and Expanding Access to Mental Health in Urban Pediatrics –TEAM UP for Children, a 4 year behavioral health integration project in pediatrics at three community health centers. TEAM UP is supported by the Richard and Susan Smith Family Foundation.

Her clinical career has focused on treating a range of childhood psychiatric disorders with a particular focus on Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, and mental health services, research on access to care and quality of treatment for underserved and vulnerable populations including children, immigrant and refugee populations. These areas of clinical practice and research are my passion and have resulted in my engagement in many rewarding projects which include: being a cofounder of a refugee immigrant mental health clinic in Boston, being an investigator in national and international studies of immigrant mental health and addictions which have contributed to the field’s understanding of treatment needs and interventions for these populations.

She has published in peer reviewed journals on the topics of Latino mental health, PTSD, improving access to mental health services by Latinos and other U.S. underserved minorities. She has also worked on developing mental health interventions and services for unaccompanied refugee minors from Latin America and in promoting integrated mental health interventions in pediatric primary care.

Fortuna’s book “Mindfulness-Based CBT for Adolescent PTSD and Addictions” was published by New Harbinger Press in October 2015 and is a product of a five-year National Institute of Drug Abuse research grant during which she developed and tested an effective intervention for adolescents with co-occurring traumatic stress and addictions.

Contact: [email protected]

Sarah Valentine, PhD

Sarah Valentine, PhD

Assistant Professor, Research
Boston University School of Medicine
The Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center

Dr. Valentine is a licensed psychologist with a PhD in Clinical Psychology from Suffolk University, as well as post-doctoral training from the Department of Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital & Harvard Medical School. Dr. Valentine has extensive experience in the implementation of evidence-based treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder with underserved populations, including racial and ethnic minorities, immigrants and refugees, sexual orientation and gender minority populations, and criminal justice involved youth. Her clinical research focuses on the reduction of health disparities through the implementation and dissemination of evidence-based treatments for mental health and substance use disorders.

Contact: [email protected]

Defining Success for Young Adults with SUDs

Sarah Valentine, PhD

Kathleen Meyers, PhD

Technical Expert Lead, JBS International

Dr. Meyers has 34 years of experience and is the current technical expert lead to SAMHSA's DSI Clinical TA Adolescent program, where she uses research- and practice-based knowledge to develop service plans and provide TA to 37 adolescent grant programs. She is best known for developing the Comprehensive Adolescent Severity Inventory (CASI), an adolescent-specific multidimensional assessment that examines adolescent functioning across 10 life areas. She is a technical expert lead for SAMHSA's Clinical Research Project, creating research tools and delivering high-impact TA to state and tribal treatment initiatives for adolescents. She previously served as senior research scientist for the Center on Families and Adolescents at the Treatment Research Institute (TRI) where she conceptualized, designed, and implemented short- and long-term mixed methods research projects and translated the findings into usable products that enhance clinical treatment.

Lightning Session - Involuntary Treatment

Leo Beletsky, JD, MPH

Leo Beletsky, JD, MPH

Associate Professor of Law and Health Sciences
Northeastern University School of Law

Professor Beletsky holds a joint appointment with the School of Law and Bouvé College of Health Sciences. His expertise is in the public health impact of laws and their enforcement, with special focus on drug overdose, infectious disease transmission and the role of the criminal justice system as a structural determinant of health. One of the nation's preeminent experts on North America's opioid crisis, Professor Beletsky is a frequent media commentator on drug policy, health equity and criminal justice issues. Those issues define the project portfolio of the School of Law's Health in Justice Action Lab, which he directs.

Throughout his career, Professor Beletsky has applied his skills and expertise in service to governmental agencies and non-governmental organizations, including the United Nations, US Department of Justice and the City of New York. Prior to joining the Northeastern community, Professor Beletsky was on the faculty of the Division of Global Public Health at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, where he retains an adjunct appointment. He received his undergraduate training in geography from Vassar College and Oxford University, a master's in public health from Brown University, his law degree from Temple University School of Law and his post-doctoral training at the Yale University Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS. He is a member of the New York State Bar.

Contact: [email protected]

Lightning Session - Trafficked Populations

Audrey Morrissey

Audrey Morrissey

Associate Director, My Life My Choice

Audrey Morrissey is the Associate Director of My Life My Choice, a program of Justice Resource Institute. Since 2002, My Life My Choice has offered a unique continuum of survivor-led services aimed at preventing the commercial sexual exploitation of children. As a local and national leader in the field of exploitation, Ms. Morrissey most recently has served as Co-Chair of the Victim Services Committee of the Massachusetts Task Force on Human Trafficking. Ms. Morrissey has also served as a primary consultant to the Massachusetts Administrative Office of the Trial Court's "Redesigning the Court's Response to Prostitution" project. Drawing from her personal experience in "the Life", Ms. Morrissey seeks to help vulnerable girls avoid being recruited into the commercial sex industry and/ or leave exploitation behind them. To this end, Ms. Morrissey facilitates My Life My Choice exploitation prevention groups throughout Greater Boston, as well as trains service providers in Massachusetts and nationally on recognizing the signs of exploitation and helping girls exit. In addition, she works individually mentoring girls who are victims of CSEC or are deemed high risk. Ms. Morrissey is a 2008 recipient of the prestigious Petra Foundation Fellowship and a 2012 recipient of The Philanthropic Initiative's Boston Neighborhood Fellows Award.

Contact: [email protected]

Break Out Session 2

Group A: Engaging Families in Intervention and Treatment

Fred Muench, PhD

Fred Muench, PhD

President and CEO, Partnership for Drug Free Kids

Fred Muench is the president and CEO of the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, a national nonprofit that supports families in addressing their children's substance use. He is a clinical psychologist with extensive knowledge and understanding of substance use disorders, as well as a leader in leveraging digital platforms to help ensure that families who are dealing with substance use disorders have better outcomes. Muench holds a doctorate in clinical psychology from Fordham University.

Contact: [email protected]

Group B: Harm and Risk Reduction

Daniel Raymond

Daniel Raymond

Policy Director The Harm Reduction Coalition

Daniel Raymond has worked in the field of harm reduction for over two and a half decades. Daniel joined Harm Reduction Coalition in 2003 and became Policy Director in 2005. In his capacity as Harm Reduction Coalition's Policy Director, Daniel works with federal and state officials, advocates, and providers to expand critical drug user health interventions, including overdose education and naloxone distribution, syringe access programs, medication-assisted treatment, HIV and hepatitis C care and treatment, and quality health care for people who use drugs. He chairs the Injection Drug Users Health Alliance and the Washington Heights CORNER Project Board of Trustees, and formerly chaired the National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable Steering Committee. Daniel has served on Governor Cuomo's Heroin and Opioid Task Force, the Food and Drugs Administration's Antiviral Drug Advisory Committee, the American Medical Association Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement Hepatitis C Workgroup, and the AASLD/IDSA Hepatitis C Guidance Panel.

Contact: [email protected]

Jessica Gaeta, MD

Jessica Gaeta, MD

Chief Medical Officer for the Boston Health Care for the Homeless
Assistant Professor of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine

Jessie M. Gaeta, MD is the Chief Medical Officer of Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program, where she has practiced Internal Medicine since 2002. She oversees the clinical practice of this unique community health center that serves 12,000 people annually across dozens of clinical sites including homeless shelters, the street, and one of the first medical respite programs in the country. Dually board certified in Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine, Dr. Gaeta graduated from the University Of Maryland School Of Medicine in 1998, trained in Internal Medicine at Boston University Medical Center, and served as Chief Resident in 2002. She completed a Physician Advocacy fellowship at Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons in 2007.

Dr. Gaeta has a long history of advocating for the needs of individuals experiencing homelessness. She has been published and spoken widely on the intersection of homelessness and health and she directs BHCHP's Institute for Research, Quality, and Policy in Homeless Health. She has led BHCHP's efforts to respond to the opioid overdose crisis, which has been magnified among people experiencing homelessness in Boston. Her passions include ending homelessness and bending the curve on overdose deaths.

Contact: [email protected]

Group C: Role of Young Adult Support Services

Justin Luke Riley

Justin Luke Riley

President and CEO Young People In Recovery

Justin Luke Riley serves as President & CEO of Young People in Recovery (YPR). YPR envisions a world where everyone can access the necessary tools to recover from substance use disorder and associated high-risk behaviors. Riley is 30 years-old and has been in long-term recovery from a substance use disorder since 2007. He graduated cum laude from the Honors & Leadership Program at the University of Colorado at Denver in 2013 and recently completed his Executive MBA at the University of Colorado. He is a former organizational development consultant and a youth and community engagement pastor in Denver; former secretary of the board of Faces & Voices of Recovery in Washington, DC; and past president of the board of Advocates for Recovery in Denver. He is also a White House Champion of Change award recipient. Most recently, Riley was featured as 1 of the 4 Social Entrepreneurs Advancing The Nationwide Recovery Movement in Forbes. He also sits on the National Advisory Council for the Substance Abuse Mental Health Administration.

Contact: [email protected]

Scott Strode

Scott Strode

National Executive Director and Founder of The Phoenix

Scott is the founder and national executive director of The Phoenix. Phoenix offers a unique approach to combat addiction by fostering a sober, supportive, physically active community for individuals in recovery from substance use disorder. Phoenix is based on Scott's own experience and discovery that a healthy, active lifestyle has a transformative effect on long-term sobriety. Scott also realized the critical component of surrounding oneself with a new sober supportive network of friends who are walking the same path. Nurturing human connections in mental, physical and spiritual fitness is a powerful way to rebuild wounded bodies and spirits and restore hope. Phoenix is unique in that its programs are free to anyone who has at least 48 hours of continuous sobriety. This removes any financial barrier that might prevent someone from taking part. Free programs include yoga, climbing, cycling, running, CrossFit, boxing, hiking, and socials. Since 2007, Phoenix has served over 26,000 individuals in 12 cities and 10 states with plans to expand into several new communities in the near future. Scott was named a Top 10 CNN Hero in 2012, received the "Advocates for Action Award" from the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, and was a TEDxMileHigh speaker in 2016. Scott's passion in life is to help others rise from the ashes of their addiction and live a full life of sobriety in long term recovery.

Contact: [email protected]

Synthesizing Insights from the Breakout Sessions

Joshua Sharfstein, MD

Joshua Sharfstein, MD

Professor of the Practice
Department of Health Policy and Management
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein is Director of the Bloomberg American Health Initiative, Vice Dean for Public Health Practice and Community Engagement, and Professor of the Practice in Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He is the author of the Public Health Crisis Survival Guide: Leadership and Management in Trying Times, published in 2018 by Oxford University Press.  Previously, Dr. Sharfstein served as Secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, as Principal Deputy Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and as Commissioner of Health for Baltimore City. From July 2001 to December 2005, he served as as minority professional staff and health policy advisor for Congressman Henry A. Waxman. A pediatrician, Dr. Sharfstein and his family live in Baltimore, Maryland.

Contact: [email protected]

Attendees

Alexander Walley, MD, MSc
Associate Professor at Boston University School of Medicine
[email protected]

Alysse Wurcel, MD, MS
Attending Physician at Tufts Medical Center
Assistant Professor of Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine
[email protected]

Ben Linas, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, Associate Professor of Epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health, Director of the HIV/HCV core of the Center for Health Economics of Treatment Interventions for Substance Use Disorders, HCV, and HIV (CHERISH);
[email protected]

Benjamin Le Cook, PhD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Cambridge Health Alliance
[email protected]

Bruce Schackman, PhD, MBA
Saul P. Steinberg Distinguished Professor of Healthcare Policy and Research, Weill Cornell Medical College
Director, CHERISH (The Center for Health Economics of Treatment Interventions for Substance Use Disorder, HCV, and HIV)
[email protected]

David Henderson, MD
Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at Boston Medical Center
Professor of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine
[email protected]

Danya Fast, PhD
Research Scientist with the BC Centre on Substance Use
[email protected]

Doug Tieman
President and CEO of Caron Treatment Centers;
[email protected]

Greg Williams
Co-Founder & Executive Vice President of Facing Addiction
[email protected]

James Hiatt, MSW
Director of Substance Use Initiatives at the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers
[email protected]

Jeffrey P. Bratberg, PharmD
Clinical Professor of Pharmacy at the University of Rhode Island
[email protected]

Jeffrey Samet, MD, MS, MA
[email protected]

Jenni Watson
[email protected]

Jennifer Tracey, MSW
Director of the Mayor's Office of Recovery Services
[email protected]

Kathryn Cates-Wessel
Chief Executive Officer of the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry
[email protected]

Kelly Matson, PharmD
Clinical Professor, The University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy
[email protected]

Lori Holleran Steiker, PhD, ACSW
Professor of Social Work at the University of Texas at Austin (UT)
Director of Instruction, Engagement, and Wellness for Undergraduate Studies at UT
[email protected]

Marc Fishman, MD
Medical Director of Maryland Treatment Centers
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
[email protected]

Margie Skeer, ScD, MPH, MSW
Associate Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine
Adjunct Associate Professor at Brown School of Public Health
[email protected]

Martha T. Kane, PhD
Clinical Director of the Addiction Services Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital
Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School
[email protected]

MaryAnn Davis, PhD
Professor of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School
Director of the Systems & Psychosocial Advances Research Center, and the Director of the Transitions to Adulthood Center for Research (ACR)
[email protected]

Michael Stein, MD
Professor and Chair of Health Law, Policy and Management at Boston University of School of Public Health
[email protected]

Nick Motu
Vice President and Chief External Affairs Officer at the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation;
[email protected]

Norman Stein
Senior Vice President, Chief Development Officer at Boston Medical Center
[email protected]

Rachelle Gardner
COO, Hope Academy
Director of adolescent services at Fairbanks Drug and Alcohol Treatment Center
[email protected]

Rebecca Butler, LCSW
Project Coordinator State Youth Treatment-Implementation SYT-I Initiative
[email protected]

Sarah Wakeman, MD
Medical Director of the Substance Use Disorders Initiative at Massachusetts General Hospital
Program Director of the Addiction Medicine Fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital
Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School
[email protected]

Senator Jason Lewis
State Senator representing the Fifth Middlesex District of Massachusetts
[email protected]

Sheryl Ryan, MD
Chief of Adolescent Medicine at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
[email protected]

Ted Park, MD
Addiction Psychiatrist at Boston Medical Center
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine
The Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center
[email protected]

Tisha Wiley, MD
Acting Deputy Branch Chief, Services Research Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse
[email protected]

Principles of Care

We’d like to gather your input on principles of care, by Summit session topics, tailored to the needs of young adults in advance of the Summit. We consider “young adult” to be a developmental category, coming after adolescence but before adulthood. However, we recognize that this definition is not universal, and we’d also appreciate your input on how best to define this group.

The principles of care we hope to address are delineated by session topics for the Summit. See Agenda

Some examples of the type of principles of care we’re hoping to establish are:

Each text box for a proposed principle of care is limited to 100 words. If you have extra space, please also include potential obstacles to fully enacting the proposed principle of care. Responses to each category are optional. We appreciate your input and look forward to discussing these in detail at the Summit.

BMC’s Nonpharmacologic Approach to Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Wins 2018 Gage Award

December 31, 1969

For More Information, Contact:
Tim Viall
Office of Communications
617.638.6857
[email protected]

(Boston) - Boston Medical Center’s (BMC) efforts to improve treatment for infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome were recognized by America’s Essential Hospitals with their 2018 Gage Award for Quality. The award is presented annually in recognition of a hospital’s activities to improve the quality of care delivered or that eliminate harmful events for individuals or groups of patients.

Led by Elisha Wachman, MD, BMC adopted nonpharmacologic interventions as first line treatment for infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome and altered the medication treatment protocols. Nonpharmacologic interventions include promoting breastfeeding, rooming-in models of care, and parental presence at the infant’s bedside. Wachman and colleagues launched the CALM (Cuddling Assists in Lowering Maternal and infant stress) program in 2016, which promotes skin-to-skin contact to help soothe the infants and utilizes trained volunteers to cuddle them when parents are not present or available. This program has resulted in lower hospital charges and shorter hospital stays for affected infants and is now being replicated and implemented across the country,

“Innovative models of care to better serve our patients and families are a top priority at BMC. This exciting and now proven approach to neonatal abstinence syndrome has resulted in greatly improved care and shorter hospital stays for our smallest, most vulnerable patients,” said Kate Walsh, BMC’s president and CEO. “We are honored to be recognized by America’s Essential Hospitals and hope that these pioneering methods can be a resource for hospitals across the country.”

America's Essential Hospitals, a national trade association that represents more than 325 hospitals committed to caring for the vulnerable and keeping communities healthy, presented the award to Wachman on June 21, 2018 at its annual conference, in San Francisco.

“Essential hospitals are pioneers in a challenging health care landscape,” said America’s Essential Hospitals President and CEO Bruce Siegel, MD, MPH. “Our Gage Award winners show how taking risks with inventive projects not only can improve quality of care within hospitals, but also expand care beyond a hospital’s walls.”

The Gage Awards, named after America’s Essential Hospitals founder Larry Gage, honor and share successful and creative member hospital programs that improve patient care and meet community needs.

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Awards and Grants | Grayken Center for Addiction | BMC

Awards and Grants

Awards

2018

  • America’s Essential Hospitals, Gage Award: Elisha Wachman, MD
  • Network for Excellence in Health Innovation, Innovator In Health: Colleen LaBelle, RN
  • Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine, 2018 Hilary E.C. Millar Award for Innovative Approaches to Adolescent Health Care: The CATALYST Program at Boston Medical Center (Medical Director: Sarah Bagley, MD)

2017

  • AMERSA Betty Ford Award: Colleen T. Labelle, MSN, RN-BC, CARN
  • 2017 AMERSA Excellence In Mentorship Award: Alexander Y. Walley, MD MSc
  • American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry: John Renner, MD
  • American College of Physicians, Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Award from The Rosenthal Family Foundation: Jeffrey Samet, MD, FACP
  • American College of Physicians, Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Award from The Rosenthal Family Foundation: Project ASSERT
  • Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce, 2017 Ten Outstanding Young Leaders: Sarah Bagley, MD

Grants

2018

  • Academic Pediatric Association: Yuan He, National trends in substance use and corresponding trends in child maltreatment
  • Academic Pediatric Association: Scott Hadland, Developing a Collaborative Care Model of Office-Based Opioid Treatment for Adolescents
  • Peter F. McManus Charitable Trust: Timothy Naimi, The Impact of Alcohol Policies on Fatalities from Alcohol-Involved Crashes Below the Legal Limit
  • Medtronic Foundation (Charities Aid Foundation America): Robert Saper, Innovations in Non-Pharmacologic Approaches to Pain Management for the Underserved
  • New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation: Alexander Walley, Addiction Consult Service TTA
  • AIDS Action Committee: Johnson, Peer Driven HIV Education and Prevention in MSM Injection Drug Users and Injection Drug Users Who Engage in Transactional Sex
  • Jack Satter Foundation: Sarah Bagley, CATALYST Clinic
  • NIAAA: Jeffrey Samet, Pilot Study of Opioid-receptor Antagonists to Reduce Pain and Inflammation among HIV-Infected Persons with Alcohol Problems
  • Office of Minority Health (DHHS): Ricardo Cruz, Project RECOVER (Referral, Engagement, Case management, and Overdose preVention Education in Recovery)
  • NIAAA: Jeffrey Samet, ST. PETER HIV-Alcohol, Protein Biomarkers and Cardiovascular Disease Risk
  • NIAAA: Eric Devine, Lacosamide effects on alcohol self administration and craving in heavy drinkers
  • CDC: Marc LaRochelle, Heroin use and overdose following changes to individual-level opioid prescribing
  • University of Baltimore, Center for Drug Control Policy and Enforcement: Alexander alley, Benjamin Linas, and Marc Larochelle, Forecasting the Impact of Corrections-based Control Policy and Enforcement
  • SAMHSA: Colleen Labelle, State Technical Assistance Team Education and Support (STATES)
  • SAMSHA: Martha Vibbert and Megan Sandel, State Opioid Grant
  • NIDA: Jeffrey Samet, Advancing Clinical Research Training within Addiction Residency Programs
  • NIDA: Sabrina Assoumou, Engaging young people who inject drugs into HCV and HIV care
  • NIDA: Benjamin Linas, Accelerating the Pace of Drug Abuse Research Using Existing Data (R01)
The BMC Field Guide to Parenting

The BMC Field Guide to Parenting


No matter how hard you try, you can’t really, fully prepare to be a parent. The good news is parents new and old can rely on BMC’s world-class pediatric team for care and advice. The BMC Field Guide to Parenting breaks down all of the developmental stages from the time your child is born, to when they leave for college. Read important facts about what to expect during all phases of childhood, and when to call the doctor.

To book a primary care appointment for your child, visit BMC Pediatrics.

You had an Abnormal Pap Smear, Now What?

You had an Abnormal Pap Smear, Now What?


You recently went to the doctor and got a call afterwards saying that you had an abnormal pap smear. Now what?  Don’t panic.

Here’s some useful information about what to do when you have had an abnormal pap smear.

“Finding out that your Pap smear results have come back ‘abnormal’ can cause a lot of anxiety for patients,” explains OBGYN Katharine White, MD, “but we don’t want patients to panic, because this does not automatically mean that you have cancer.”

Most abnormal Pap smear results are not caused by cancer, but instead are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), a very common sexually transmitted infection. These abnormal cells will usually go away on their own, but they’re more likely to stick around in women who smoke or who have an impaired immune system. Other less common causes of abnormal Pap smear results include other sexually transmitted infections such as herpes or trichomonas, vaginal infections caused by bacteria or yeast, or being post-menopausal.

So, now what? First, talk with your doctor about next steps. 

You may need more tests to determine what exactly is causing cells to be abnormal. One test you may need is a colposcopy which looks at the cervix through a microscope. During the colposcopy, you will probably have a biopsy, where a small sample of the cervix is removed to be tested further. Or you may just need to be monitored and have another pap smear in a few months.

“We encourage women to schedule their regular pap smears so that they may be proactive about their health,” adds Dr. White. In cases when cancer is discovered, the survival rate for cervical cancer is very high when it is detected early. “The most important thing to know about an abnormal pap test is that as long as you follow up with all of the recommended testing, you’re not likely to develop cancer.”

Don’t panic about your abnormal Pap smear results, but do be sure to schedule your follow-up appointments and schedule your regular Pap smear tests.

Schedule a Pap smear with one of our providers by visiting BMC.org/obgyn.

Methadone Should Get a Home in Primary Care

December 31, 1969

For More Information, Contact:
Tim Viall
Office of Communications
617.638.6857
[email protected]

(Boston) - Physicians and public health officials are calling on Congress to update the laws that regulate methadone prescribing to help reduce barriers to a treatment proven to be effective for opioid use disorder. According to a newly published New England Journal of Medicine Perspective, allowing methadone to be prescribed and dispensed in primary care practices would increase access and get the medicine into the hands of an at-risk patient population.

Methadone in Primary Care – One Small Step for Congress, One Giant Leap for Addiction Treatment,” is authored by Jeffrey Samet, MD, MPH, chief of general internal medicine at Boston Medical Center (BMC), Michael Botticelli, executive director of the Grayken Center for Addiction at BMC, and Monica Bharel, MD, MPH, commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health.

Opioid overdoses claim an average of 115 lives a day. Opioid use disorder, the major driver of overdose deaths, is a complex medical condition that can be successfully treated, but treatments remain inaccessible for many people, particular those in rural and suburban communities. Only roughly 20 percent of Americans who have an OUD take one of the three FDA approved, evidence-based medications – methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone – according to a 2015 JAMA study.

The oldest and one of the most effective medications to treat OUD, methadone, is available in primary care settings by prescription in Great Britain, Canada, and Australia. This is standard practice in those countries and seen as non-controversial because it benefits the patient, the care team, and the community. In the U.S., methadone is typically administered daily under supervision to patients in specialty clinics, requiring daily trips to these clinics and making it a difficult treatment to adhere to. Additionally, these clinics can be hours away and are not always accessible by public transportation.

“Allowing more qualified and trained physicians and other advance practice clinicians to prescribe methadone prevents the need to establish new methadone clinics for people living in nonurban areas, which could be cost- or infrastructure-prohibitive, and it diminishes the ‘not in my backyard’ sentiment that is commonly associated with them,” said Samet, who is also a professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine and the Perspective’s corresponding author.

Administering methadone in primary care could also reduce the stigma associated with opioid use disorder and align its management more with other medical conditions that are already treated seamlessly in primary care.

The authors suggest that the Controlled Substances Act could be amended to allow clinicians who have the required training to prescribe buprenorphine for opioid use disorder to also engage patients in methadone treatment for the condition in office-based, primary care settings.

“The goal is to increase access to medication for this treatable disease, and it makes sense that we take concrete steps to streamline substance use disorder into standard medical care,’’ Commissioner Bharel said.

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Boston Medical Center, John Hancock Celebrate $5M Raised Through Boston Marathon Non-Profit Program

December 31, 1969

For More Information, Contact:
Jessica Lyons
Office of Communications
617-638-6838
[email protected]

Brittany Straughn
John Hancock
617-697-1159
[email protected]

Mural unveiled today at the hospital will honor Team BMC participants

(Boston) – Boston Medical Center (BMC) is pleased to announce that Team BMC has raised $5 million through their partnership with John Hancock’s Boston Marathon Non-Profit Program. To commemorate the milestone, the institutions will unveil a 40-foot mural at the hospital depicting Team BMC runners on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 at 11:15 a.m.

Team BMC has been a part of the John Hancock Boston Marathon Non-Profit Program for 16 years, with funds going toward a campaign to renovate, expand, and improve the medical center’s campus and emergency services. However, much of the $5 million has been raised over the past five years as Team BMC has grown.

“Without the John Hancock partnership, there would be no Team BMC,” said Kate Walsh, President and CEO of BMC. “Their generosity in providing support to our runners has helped BMC continue to grow our emergency services and provide the best care for patients in Boston and across the region.”

The mural will wrap a wall that leads patients from the lobby of the Menino Pavilion to the new emergency department, a symbolic placement to honor the determination and generosity of Team BMC runners, their supporters, and John Hancock. It depicts the Boston Marathon race route while highlighting the motivation behind many of the team members and the inspiration that helped them cross the finish line.

“John Hancock is proud to support Boston Medical Center—a global leader in delivering exceptional care to all in need,” said Marianne Harrison, CEO of John Hancock. “Together, we are building healthier, more equitable communities by empowering individuals and families to live better lives.”

With John Hancock’s continued investment and support for the hospital, Team BMC has grown beyond the marathon program and is running and raising funds for causes all year long. In addition to the Boston Marathon, there are now nine races in the Team BMC portfolio, including a “Race for a Reason” program that allows runners to choose any race and any program at BMC that they’d like to raise funds for.  

Media are invited to attend the mural unveiling, and interviews with John Hancock president and CEO Marianne Harrison and BMC president and CEO, Kate Walsh, will be available.  

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About John Hancock and Manulife
John Hancock is a division of Manulife Financial Corporation, a leading international financial services group that helps people make their decisions easier and lives better. We operate primarily as John Hancock in the United States, and Manulife elsewhere. We provide financial advice, insurance and wealth and asset management solutions for individuals, groups and institutions. Assets under management and administration by Manulife and its subsidiaries were over $1.1 trillion (US$850 billion) as of March 31, 2018. Manulife Financial Corporation trades as MFC on the TSX, NYSE, and PSE, and under 945 on the SEHK. Manulife can be found at manulife.com

One of the largest life insurers in the United States, John Hancock supports approximately 10.7 million Americans with a broad range of financial products, including life insurance, annuities, investments, 401(k) plans, and college savings plans. We also offer advice through Signator, a network of independent financial advisors. Additional information about John Hancock may be found at johnhancock.com

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