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Conditions We Treat

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All Conditions We Treat


The gallbladder is a small organ under the liver on the right side of the abdomen that stores digestive fluids called bile, responsible for breaking down the fat in digestion. Bile flows through 3 different ducts (including the bile duct) to the small intestine. Different conditions that affect the gallbladder include cancer, cholecystitis, and inflammation. Obesity and diabetes are two risk factors that affect gallbladder conditions.

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Gallstones form in the gallbladder, a small organ under the liver, from an excess of cholesterol and bilirubin in the digestive fluid (bile) that is stored there. Gallstones can be “silent” – meaning no pain and usually no treatment, or cause pain and other symptoms as they enter the ducts to the small intestine. Increased risk for gallstones is associated with obesity, diabetes and a diet high in cholesterol or fat. Gallstones are treated with surgery and medication, depending on the severity.

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Gallstones form in the gallbladder, a small organ under the liver, from an excess of cholesterol and bilirubin in the digestive fluid (bile) that is stored there. Gallstones don’t form in children very often and can be “silent” – meaning no pain and usually no treatment, though they can cause pain and other symptoms in the child’s upper right belly as they enter the ducts to the small intestine. Increased risk for gallstones is associated with obesity, diabetes, come blood diseases, and taking certain medications.

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Ganglion Cyst of the Wrist 

A ganglion cyst of the wrist is a common, non-cancerous and fluid-filled cyst (growth) most often found on the top of the wrist. The cyst usually forms a noticeable lump, and can come and go with no other symptoms, though sometimes it does press on nerves, causing pain. There is not a known cause, though women are more affected than men.

The following departments see patients with Ganglion Cyst of the Wrist:


Gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, occurs when acid from the stomach backs up into the esophagus. Normally, food travels from the mouth, down through the esophagus and into the stomach. A ring of muscle at the bottom of the esophagus, the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), contracts to keep the acidic contents of the stomach from “refluxing” or coming back up into the esophagus. In those who have GERD, the LES does not close properly, allowing acid to move up the esophagus.

Learn More About Gastroesophageal Reflux (GERD) >