Center for HIV/AIDS Care & Research at BMC

Center for HIV/AIDS Care & Research

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Research

Paul R. Skolnik, MD

Professor of Medicine
Director, Center for HIV/AIDS Care and Research

Center for HIV/AIDS Care and Research
Boston Medical Center
650 Albany Street, EBRC 608
Boston, MA 02118
P: 617.414.3520
F: 617.414.5218
paul.skolnik@bmc.org

Education

BA Yale University
MD University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Research

Dr. Skolnik’s current basic research interests include HIV-related innate immune responses in the lung and modeling of cytokine and chemokine networks in the lung. Patient-derived samples are used in these studies whenever possible to most closely mirror the in vivo situation. Dr. Skolnik has expertise in clinical HIV/AIDS research design and methodology and is site leader for the Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group (AACTG) at Boston Medical Center. He has carried out many clinical trials of investigational immunotherapeutic and antiretroviral drug therapies for HIV infection, and especially studies the immunologic effects of these anti-HIV therapies. Dr. Skolnik has a substantial record of serving as mentor for successful basic and clinical research trainees on NIH-funded T32 training grants and K08 awards.


Selected Publications

  1. Skolnik PR, Rabbi MF, Mathys JM, Greenberg AS. Stimulation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors a and g Blocks HIV-1 Replication and TNFa Production in Acutely Infected Primary Blood Cells, Chronically Infected U1 Cells, and Alveolar Macrophages from HIV-Infected Subjects. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 31(1):1-10, 2002. [Erratum: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 33(5):657, 2003.]

  2. Perloff ES, Duan SX, Skolnik PR, Greenblatt DJ, von Moltke LL. Atazanavir: Effects on P-gp transport and CYP3A metabolism in vitro. Drug Metab Disp. 33(6):764-770, 2005.

  3. Rostasy K, Gorgun G, Kleyner Y, Garcia A, Kramer M, Melanson SM, Mathys JM, Yiannoutsos C, Skolnik PR, Navia BA. TNFa leads to increased cell surface expression of CXCR4 in SK N MC cells. J Neurovirol. 11(3):247-255, 2005.

  4. Greenwald JL, Rich CA, Bessega S, Posner MA, Maeda JL, Skolnik PR. Evaluation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s recommendations regarding routine testing for human immunodeficiency virus by an inpatient service: Who are we missing? Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 81(4):452-458, 2006.

  5. Pott GB, Sailer CA, Porat R, Peskind RL, Fuchs AC, Angel JB, Skolnik PR, Jacobson MA, Giordano MF, LeBeaut A, Grint PC, Dinarello CA, Shapiro L. Effect of a four-week course of interleukin-10 on cytokine production in a placebo-controlled study of HIV-1-infected subjects. Eur Cytokine Netw. 18(2):49-58, 2007.

  6. Gulick RM, Su Z, Flexner C, Hughes MD, Skolnik PR, Wilkin TJ, Gross R, Krambrink A, Coakley E, Greaves WL, Zolopa A, Reichman R, Godfrey C, Hirsch M, Kuritzkes DR, for the ACTG 5211 Team. Phase 2 study of the safety and efficacy of vicriviroc, a CCR5 inhibitor, in HIV-1-infected, treatment-experienced patients: ACTG 5211. J Infect Dis. 196(2):304-312, 2007.

  7. Vranceanu AM, Safren SA, Lu M, Coady WM, Skolnik PR, Rogers WH, Wilson IB. The relationship of post traumatic stress disorder and depression to antiretroviral medication adherence in persons with HIV. AIDS Patient Care STDs. 22(4):313-21, 2008.

  8. Mehta SD, Hall J, Greenwald JL, Cranston K, Skolnik PR. Patient risks, outcomes, and costs of voluntary HIV testing at five testing sites within a medical center. Public Health Rep. 2008 (accepted for publication).

  9. Nicol M, Pereira A, Mathys JM, Skolnik P. Altered TLR-dependent innate immune responses in the lung during HIV 1 infection. 14th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2007), Los Angeles, CA, February 25-28, 2007 (poster abstract 432).

  10. Nicol MQ, Hayete B, Pereira A, Rarick M, Mathys J-M, Collins J, Skolnik P. HIV-1 infection alters cytokine and chemokine networks that influence innate immunity in the lung. 94th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Immunologists (Immunology 2007), Miami Beach, FL, May 18-22, 2007 (abstract 124).

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771 Albany Street
Boston, MA 02118
Call: 617.414.7059
Fax: 617.638.8070


Evans Biomedical Research Center
650 Albany Street, 6th Floor
Boston, MA 02118
Call: 617.414.3504
Fax: 617.414.5283


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